Archive for the 'Nano-tech' Category

Quantum Computer Built Inside a Diamond

• April, 2012

Diamonds are forever — or, at least, the effects of this diamond on quantum computing may be. A team that includes scientists from USC has built a quantum computer in a diamond, the first of its kind to include protection against “decoherence” — noise that prevents the computer from functioning properly. The demonstration shows the viability of solid-state quantum computers, which — unlike earlier gas- and liquid-state systems — may represent the future of quantum computing because they can be easily scaled up in size.

Light Created from a Vacuum

• December, 2011

The Casimir Effect Observed in Superconducting Circuit Scientists at Chalmers have succeeded in creating light from vacuum — observing an effect first predicted over 40 years ago. In an innovative experiment, the scientists have managed to capture some of the photons that are constantly appearing and disappearing in the vacuum. The experiment is based on one of the most counterintuitive, yet, one of the most important principles in quantum mechanics: that vacuum is by no means empty nothingness. In fact, the vacuum is full of

Faster-than-light neutrino claim bolstered

• September, 2011

Representatives from the OPERA collaboration spoke in a seminar at CERN today, supporting their astonishing claim that neutrinos can travel faster than the speed of light. The result is conceptually simple: neutrinos travelling from a particle accelerator at CERN in Switzerland arrived 60 nanoseconds too early at a detector in the Gran Sasso cavern in Italy. And it relies on three conceptually simple measurements, explained Dario Autiero of the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Lyon: the distance between the labs, the time the neutrinos left

Dr. Michio Kaku: “The World in 2030”

• May, 2011

“The World in 2030: How Science will Affect Computers, Medicine, Jobs, Our Lifestyles and the Wealth of our Nations” Wednesday, October 28, 2009 Dr. Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist and the Henry Semat Professor at the City College of New York and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he has taught for more than 30 years. He is a graduate of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and earned his doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Kaku

Theoretical Breakthrough: Generating Matter and Antimatter from Nothing

• April, 2011

Under just the right conditions — which involve an ultra-high-intensity laser beam and a two-mile-long particle accelerator — it could be possible to create something out of nothing, according to University of Michigan researchers. The scientists and engineers have developed new equations that show how a high-energy electron beam combined with an intense laser pulse could rip apart a vacuum into its fundamental matter and antimatter components, and set off a cascade of events that generates additional pairs of particles and antiparticles. “We can now

Large Hadron Collider Set To Hit 7 Tera-Electron Volts

• April, 2010

Large Hadron Collider Set To Hit 7 Tera-Electron Volts The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will for the first time collide particles at an energy of 7 tera-electron volts (TeV), or 3.5 TeV per beam, on March 30, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) said on its website. The world’s most powerful atom smasher accelerated its proton beams to 3.5 TeV per beam on March 19, but no collisions were practiced then. “Between now and March 30, the LHC team will be working with 3.5

LHC Maintenance shutdown in 2011

• March, 2010

LHC Maintenance shutdown in 2011 Katie Yurkewicz The LHC will shut down for about one year – but not until late 2011 What the BBC reported yesterday is true, but is not exactly news. A revised schedule for the LHC’s next few years was announced in early February by CERN. According to the revised schedule, the LHC will run at a maximum energy of 3.5 TeV per beam for a period of about 18 months, starting with the first collisions at 3.5 TeV per beam

Physicist Discovers How to Teleport Energy

• February, 2010

Physicist Discovers How to Teleport Energy First, they teleported photons, then atoms and ions. Now one physicist has worked out how to do it with energy, a technique that has profound implications for the future of physics. In 1993, Charlie Bennett at IBM’s Watson Research Center in New York State and a few pals showed how to transmit quantum information from one point in space to another without traversing the intervening space. The technique relies on the strange quantum phenomenon called entanglement, in which two

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

• August, 2008

The largest particle accelerator in the world, the LHC of the European Center for Physics, will start in August , as being told by CERN in Geneva. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a circular tunnel 27 kilometers long at the height of Geneva and the Swiss-French border. In this tunnel particles are fired at nearly the speed of light that in turn come into conflict with each other. This collision creates a multitude of new particles. At full speed and thanks to more than