Archive for the 'Journalism' Category

Hitler’s secret flying saucers

• January, 2011

Article:: Did the Führer plan to attack London and New York in UFOs? As Hitler’s armies began to crumble on fronts as far apart as Stalingrad and North Africa, he turned in increasing desperation to his scientists to create a war-winning super-weapon. Some, like the V2 rockets and the first jet fighters, saw action but came too late to halt defeat. Others were so outrageously ambitious that they never got past the drawing board. The idea of building flying saucers to bomb London and even

Ancient rock art alive with bacteria

• January, 2011

Researchers say the ancient ‘Bradshaw art’ rock in Western Australia has maintained its vivid colors because it is colonized by living bacteria and fungi. Studies conducted by Jack Pettigrew and his colleagues at the University of Queensland showed that the rock art has kept its colors after at least 40,000 years. The team studied 80 of Bradshaw rock artworks in 16 locations within Western Australia’s Kimberley region, concentrating on Tassel and Sash, two of the oldest known styles of Bradshaw art. Analyses showed that many

Company digging mine in Afghanistan unearths Buddhist monastery

• December, 2010

A Chinese company digging an unexploited copper mine in Afghanistan has unearthed ancient statues of Buddha in a sprawling 2,600-year-old Buddhist monastery. Archaeologists are rushing to salvage what they can from a major 7th century B.C. religious site along the famed Silk Road connecting Asia and the Middle East. The ruins, including the monastery and domed shrines known as ‘stupas,’ will likely be largely destroyed once work at the mine begins. The ruins were discovered as labourers excavated the site on behalf of the Chinese

Island of mud appears near Balochistan

• December, 2010

KARACHI: A soft muddy island appeared a few kilometers from the seashore in Hingol area of Balochistan. According to Pakistan Fisher Folk (PFF), the island is 90 meters (m) high with a span of approximately three kilometers (km). PFF spokesman, Sami Memon told Dawn.com that the fishermen of Ibrahim Hyderi area described the occurrence after returning from Hingol. Fishermen observed white, slippery hot sand erupting from water, three km away from the beach. Before the upsurge of sludge, fishermen also observed high tides near the

Germany pledges millions for Taliban

• November, 2010

Germany’s foreign ministry says it has signed an agreement with Afghanistan to give 14 million dollars to Taliban militants, who choose to lay down their arms, every year. Berlin says the contract will be valid for five years and the cash will only be paid to militants who lay down their weapons. German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle said on Wednesday that reintegrating former militants into the Afghan social and political fabric is crucial to stabilizing Afghanistan, DPA reported.

U.N. urged to freeze climate geo-engineering projects

• November, 2010

* Cloud whitening, solar reflectors, ocean seeding studied * Environmentalists say such schemes are unproven, risky * Advocates say projects could help fight global warming The United Nations should impose a moratorium on “geo-engineering” projects such as artificial volcanoes and vast cloud-seeding schemes to fight climate change, green groups say, fearing they could harm nature and mankind. The risks were too great because the impacts of manipulating nature on a vast scale were not fully known, the groups said at a major U.N. meeting in

Comet impact did not cause mammoths to die out.

• November, 2010

Comet impact did not cause mammoths to die out, scientists say A mass extinction that caused the death of giant species of mammal including mammoths, sabre-tooth tigers and giant beavers was not caused by a comet impact, scientists have concluded. Researchers have previously suggested that the last mass extinction of animals on Earth was triggered by a comet colliding with the planet and sparking a sudden drop in temperature around 13,000 years ago. This sudden change in climate, known as the Younger-Dryas climate reversal, saw

Mixed Feelings – technology induced synaesthesia.

• November, 2010

See with your tongue. Navigate with your skin. Fly by the seat of your pants (literally). How researchers can tap the plasticity of the brain to hack our 5 senses — and build a few new ones. By Sunny Bains For six weird weeks in the fall of 2004, Udo Wächter had an unerring sense of direction. Every morning after he got out of the shower, Wächter, a sysadmin at the University of Osnabrück in Germany, put on a wide beige belt lined with 13

Microbes May Consume Far More Oil-Spill Waste Than Earlier Thought

• October, 2010

Microbes living at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico may consume far more of the gaseous waste from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill than previously thought, according to research carried out within 100 miles of the spill site. A paper on that research, conducted before the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded six months ago, will appear in a forthcoming issue of the journal Deep-Sea Research II. It describes the anaerobic oxidation of methane, a key component of the Gulf oil spill, by microbes living in