Archive for the 'Space' Category

We’ve built a flying saucer, boasts Iran

• April, 2011

(even if it does look like it belongs in a 1950s B-movie) It’s not clear how far or how high it can fly – or even how big it is and what makes it take off. But an aircraft created by scientists in Iran is, they claim, the world’s first flying saucer. Called the Zohal – or Saturn in English – it said the unmanned spaceship is designed for ‘aerial imaging’ but added it can be used for ‘various missions’.

Sun Pictures: A Full Year in a Single Frame – Analemmas

• January, 2011

Sun’s Path in 2010 Can a single picture sum up all of 2010? In a way, yes. The above multiple-exposure photo shows the figure-eight path of the sun over the course of the entire year, known as an analemma. Analemma photographs are made by taking a picture of the sun from the same place at the same time of day once or twice a week, generating 30 to 50 frames. This picture, made in Veszprem, Hungary, combines 36 photos of the sun taken at 10

Moon Rising – NASA moon cover-up?

• December, 2010

<<Official movie intro>> On February 25,1994 1.8 million photos were taken of the Moon during the Clementine Mission. Different variations were taken including “Full Color” photos. The front cover of this DVD is one of hundreds of photos featured in the film. This is the first time in human history the Moon is being revealed to you in its’ “Full Natural Color.” On the matter concerning whether or not we went to the Moon, we landed there without a doubt. This film is about what

NASA’s Fermi Telescope Finds Giant Structure in our Galaxy

• November, 2010

NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has unveiled a previously unseen structure centered in the Milky Way. The feature spans 50,000 light-years and may be the remnant of an eruption from a supersized black hole at the center of our galaxy. “What we see are two gamma-ray-emitting bubbles that extend 25,000 light-years north and south of the galactic center,” said Doug Finkbeiner, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., who first recognized the feature. “We don’t fully understand their nature or origin.”

Eye of the Sun .::. Picture

• October, 2010

Eye of the Sun: Telescope captures most detailed image ever of a sunspot that is bigger than Earth Like the centre of a flower or a mysterious eye, this is the most detailed image of a sunspot ever captured using visible light. The stunning picture was taken using the Big Bear Telescope in California and is the best photo of a huge sunspot that is around 8,000 miles in diameter. At the centre of the sunspot the temperature is around 3,600C, while the surrounding regions

Hubble Spots Ghostly Space Spiral

• September, 2010

When I first saw this ghostly Hubble Space Telescope image, I assumed that faint blurry spiral was a lens flare or some other photographic anomaly. But on closer inspection, the details started to present themselves. As imaged by the space telescope’s sensitive Advanced Camera for Surveys, this striking pattern is formed by material being ejected from a dying star. But this isn’t a lone star; there’s a second star — a binary partner — orbiting with it and modulating the expanding gas. SLIDE SHOW: Top