Archive for the 'Science' Category

Quantum Computer Built Inside a Diamond

• April, 2012

Diamonds are forever — or, at least, the effects of this diamond on quantum computing may be. A team that includes scientists from USC has built a quantum computer in a diamond, the first of its kind to include protection against “decoherence” — noise that prevents the computer from functioning properly. The demonstration shows the viability of solid-state quantum computers, which — unlike earlier gas- and liquid-state systems — may represent the future of quantum computing because they can be easily scaled up in size.

Medicinal Cannabis and its Impact on Human Health

• April, 2012

Executive Producer: James Schmachtenberger Director & Producer: Lindsey Ward Director of Photography: Troy Brajkovich In this myth shattering, information packed documentary, learn from physicians and leading researchers about medicinal cannabis and its demonstrated affects on human health. Topics include: *What the consensus is from over 15000 scientific and medical trials *What conditions have been proven to benefit from medical marijuana *Its historical use as medicine dating back over 5300 years *Methods of delivery and their different advantages *Government sponsored studies intended to show Marijuana having

Derren Brown Investigates

• February, 2012

The Man Who Contacts The Dead::

Into The Fire

• December, 2011

Press For Truth Presents Into The Fire World leaders and activists from around the world gathered for the G20 Summit. With over 19,000 police officers and security personnel on hand, the results lead to over 1100 arrests, martial law in downtown Toronto, and the most massive violation of civil liberties in Canadian history.

Vaccines and autism

• December, 2011

For all those who’ve declared the autism-vaccine debate over – a new scientific review begs to differ. It considers a host of peer-reviewed, published theories that show possible connections between vaccines and autism. The article in the Journal of Immunotoxicology is entitled “Theoretical aspects of autism: Causes–A review.” The author is Helen Ratajczak, surprisingly herself a former senior scientist at a pharmaceutical firm. Ratajczak did what nobody else apparently has bothered to do: she reviewed the body of published science since autism was first described

Light Created from a Vacuum

• December, 2011

The Casimir Effect Observed in Superconducting Circuit Scientists at Chalmers have succeeded in creating light from vacuum — observing an effect first predicted over 40 years ago. In an innovative experiment, the scientists have managed to capture some of the photons that are constantly appearing and disappearing in the vacuum. The experiment is based on one of the most counterintuitive, yet, one of the most important principles in quantum mechanics: that vacuum is by no means empty nothingness. In fact, the vacuum is full of

Quantum Levitation

• October, 2011

Video courtesy of the Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC), representing the science center and museum field worldwide. To learn more, visit www.astc.org. Follow us on Twitter: @ScienceCenters. Tel-Aviv University demos quantum superconductors locked in a magnetic field (www.quantumlevitation.com). For an explanation of the physics behind this demonstration, visit www.quantumlevitation.com/levitation/The_physics.html. With the theme “Knowledge that Works: From Theory to Practice,” the 2011 ASTC Annual Conference featured more than 100 sessions, which highlighted how science centers and museums are putting new ideas to practical use to serve

World’s First Time Machine

• October, 2011

Introducing:: “World’s First Time Machine” (Documentary by the Discovery Channel) Contains some interesting predictions about our “near” future…

Faster-than-light neutrino claim bolstered

• September, 2011

Representatives from the OPERA collaboration spoke in a seminar at CERN today, supporting their astonishing claim that neutrinos can travel faster than the speed of light. The result is conceptually simple: neutrinos travelling from a particle accelerator at CERN in Switzerland arrived 60 nanoseconds too early at a detector in the Gran Sasso cavern in Italy. And it relies on three conceptually simple measurements, explained Dario Autiero of the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Lyon: the distance between the labs, the time the neutrinos left