Archive for the 'Science' Category

Obama could kill fossil fuels overnight with… thorium!

• March, 2011

If Barack Obama were to marshal America’s vast scientific and strategic resources behind a new Manhattan Project, he might reasonably hope to reinvent the global energy landscape and sketch an end to our dependence on fossil fuels within three to five years. We could then stop arguing about wind mills, deepwater drilling, IPCC hockey sticks, or strategic reliance on the Kremlin. History will move on fast. Muddling on with the status quo is not a grown-up policy. The International Energy Agency says the world must

Pavegen: Energy Generating Pavement Hits the Streets

• March, 2011

Any one point on a busy street can receive up to 50,000 steps a day, so imagine if you could take all that foot traffic and turn it into something useful – like energy! A new product designed by Laurence Kemball-Cook, the director of Pavegen Systems Ltd., can do just that. With a minuscule flex of 5mm, the energy generating pavement is able to absorb the kinetic energy produced by every footstep, creating 2.1 watts of electricity per hour. Every time a rubber Pavegen stone

Human brain has more switches than all computers on Earth

• March, 2011

The human brain is truly awesome. A typical, healthy one houses some 200 billion nerve cells, which are connected to one another via hundreds of trillions of synapses. Each synapse functions like a microprocessor, and tens of thousands of them can connect a single neuron to other nerve cells. In the cerebral cortex alone, there are roughly 125 trillion synapses, which is about how many stars fill 1,500 Milky Way galaxies. These synapses are, of course, so tiny (less than a thousandth of a millimeter

Zeitgeist – Moving Forward

• February, 2011

This Zeitgeist movie does touch various strings concerning the current and past problems of our societies. Therefore it should kick-start most people into thinking and reflecting on the situation… Whether too extreme or not, we can’t ignore the essence. It’s been time for REAL change for quite some time now…

Sun Pictures: A Full Year in a Single Frame – Analemmas

• January, 2011

Sun’s Path in 2010 Can a single picture sum up all of 2010? In a way, yes. The above multiple-exposure photo shows the figure-eight path of the sun over the course of the entire year, known as an analemma. Analemma photographs are made by taking a picture of the sun from the same place at the same time of day once or twice a week, generating 30 to 50 frames. This picture, made in Veszprem, Hungary, combines 36 photos of the sun taken at 10

Ancient rock art alive with bacteria

• January, 2011

Researchers say the ancient ‘Bradshaw art’ rock in Western Australia has maintained its vivid colors because it is colonized by living bacteria and fungi. Studies conducted by Jack Pettigrew and his colleagues at the University of Queensland showed that the rock art has kept its colors after at least 40,000 years. The team studied 80 of Bradshaw rock artworks in 16 locations within Western Australia’s Kimberley region, concentrating on Tassel and Sash, two of the oldest known styles of Bradshaw art. Analyses showed that many

Moon Rising – NASA moon cover-up?

• December, 2010

<<Official movie intro>> On February 25,1994 1.8 million photos were taken of the Moon during the Clementine Mission. Different variations were taken including “Full Color” photos. The front cover of this DVD is one of hundreds of photos featured in the film. This is the first time in human history the Moon is being revealed to you in its’ “Full Natural Color.” On the matter concerning whether or not we went to the Moon, we landed there without a doubt. This film is about what

Company digging mine in Afghanistan unearths Buddhist monastery

• December, 2010

A Chinese company digging an unexploited copper mine in Afghanistan has unearthed ancient statues of Buddha in a sprawling 2,600-year-old Buddhist monastery. Archaeologists are rushing to salvage what they can from a major 7th century B.C. religious site along the famed Silk Road connecting Asia and the Middle East. The ruins, including the monastery and domed shrines known as ‘stupas,’ will likely be largely destroyed once work at the mine begins. The ruins were discovered as labourers excavated the site on behalf of the Chinese

Island of mud appears near Balochistan

• December, 2010

KARACHI: A soft muddy island appeared a few kilometers from the seashore in Hingol area of Balochistan. According to Pakistan Fisher Folk (PFF), the island is 90 meters (m) high with a span of approximately three kilometers (km). PFF spokesman, Sami Memon told Dawn.com that the fishermen of Ibrahim Hyderi area described the occurrence after returning from Hingol. Fishermen observed white, slippery hot sand erupting from water, three km away from the beach. Before the upsurge of sludge, fishermen also observed high tides near the