Archive for the 'Science' Category

NASA’s Fermi Telescope Finds Giant Structure in our Galaxy

• November, 2010

NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has unveiled a previously unseen structure centered in the Milky Way. The feature spans 50,000 light-years and may be the remnant of an eruption from a supersized black hole at the center of our galaxy. “What we see are two gamma-ray-emitting bubbles that extend 25,000 light-years north and south of the galactic center,” said Doug Finkbeiner, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., who first recognized the feature. “We don’t fully understand their nature or origin.”

U.N. urged to freeze climate geo-engineering projects

• November, 2010

* Cloud whitening, solar reflectors, ocean seeding studied * Environmentalists say such schemes are unproven, risky * Advocates say projects could help fight global warming The United Nations should impose a moratorium on “geo-engineering” projects such as artificial volcanoes and vast cloud-seeding schemes to fight climate change, green groups say, fearing they could harm nature and mankind. The risks were too great because the impacts of manipulating nature on a vast scale were not fully known, the groups said at a major U.N. meeting in

Comet impact did not cause mammoths to die out.

• November, 2010

Comet impact did not cause mammoths to die out, scientists say A mass extinction that caused the death of giant species of mammal including mammoths, sabre-tooth tigers and giant beavers was not caused by a comet impact, scientists have concluded. Researchers have previously suggested that the last mass extinction of animals on Earth was triggered by a comet colliding with the planet and sparking a sudden drop in temperature around 13,000 years ago. This sudden change in climate, known as the Younger-Dryas climate reversal, saw

Mixed Feelings – technology induced synaesthesia.

• November, 2010

See with your tongue. Navigate with your skin. Fly by the seat of your pants (literally). How researchers can tap the plasticity of the brain to hack our 5 senses — and build a few new ones. By Sunny Bains For six weird weeks in the fall of 2004, Udo Wächter had an unerring sense of direction. Every morning after he got out of the shower, Wächter, a sysadmin at the University of Osnabrück in Germany, put on a wide beige belt lined with 13

Microbes May Consume Far More Oil-Spill Waste Than Earlier Thought

• October, 2010

Microbes living at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico may consume far more of the gaseous waste from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill than previously thought, according to research carried out within 100 miles of the spill site. A paper on that research, conducted before the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded six months ago, will appear in a forthcoming issue of the journal Deep-Sea Research II. It describes the anaerobic oxidation of methane, a key component of the Gulf oil spill, by microbes living in

Eye of the Sun .::. Picture

• October, 2010

Eye of the Sun: Telescope captures most detailed image ever of a sunspot that is bigger than Earth Like the centre of a flower or a mysterious eye, this is the most detailed image of a sunspot ever captured using visible light. The stunning picture was taken using the Big Bear Telescope in California and is the best photo of a huge sunspot that is around 8,000 miles in diameter. At the centre of the sunspot the temperature is around 3,600C, while the surrounding regions

The Correlation Between Corexit and Klondike Bars

• October, 2010

BP Is Teaching Kids The Correlation Between Corexit and Klondike Bars BP and the federal government are working together to brainwash our kids into believing that Corexit is perfectly safe and the gulf is recovering right on schedule. They literally are teaching our school children that Corexit is in numerous items that we eat and poses absolutely no problem. As we reported days ago, BP plans on “dispelling” the myths of the dispersant in schools throughout the gulf. Why is the government letting BP brainwash

Full-Body Scan Technology In Street-Roving Vans

• October, 2010

As the privacy controversy around full-body security scans begins to simmer, it’s worth noting that courthouses and airport security checkpoints aren’t the only places where backscatter x-ray vision is being deployed. The same technology, capable of seeing through clothes and walls, has also been rolling out on U.S. streets. American Science & Engineering, a company based in Billerica, Massachusetts, has sold U.S. and foreign government agencies more than 500 backscatter x-ray scanners mounted in vans that can be driven past neighboring vehicles to see their

Nature By Numbers

• October, 2010

Nature by Numbers from Cristóbal Vila on Vimeo. Amazing video, speaks for itself, enjoy and check out more of this work here =>> eterea